...
Latvian Centre for Contemporary Art

Education

LCCA implements educational events for children, young people and grown-ups that stimulate understanding of contemporary art – creative workshops, excursions, talks, conversation workshops, presentations by artists and curators, discussions, thematic seminars, conferences – as well as publishing booklets, worksheets and guides. LCCA also organises LCCA Evening School, a cycle of text-reading workshops dedicated to contemporary art, an international LCCA Summer School as well as offering the opportunity to learn the skills of art messengers or mediators.

Education / For Kids and Families

1 / 1

Curator: Māra Žeikare

Contacts: mara@lcca.lv

Tālr. + 371 67039282

LCCA educational programme for children and young people provides the opportunity to get to know the secrets of art and social processes through exhibitions and their accompanying events, acquire a creative attitude towards life through encounters with artists and discover the different forms of contemporary art. In this section of the page you will find information on current activities for families with children and school groups, as well as practical materials about contemporary art for children and young people – exciting guides about Latvian artists.

1 / 10

Education / Art Mediation

LCCA Art Mediation programme is a special series of activities where people from different professions, each based on their own experience as well as engagement with the particular exhibition, are able to assist different viewers, enabling everyone to make the most of their visit to the exhibition. Art mediators are trained at events organised by the LCCA following pre-announced open calls, both by providing information on the themes of the particular exhibitions as well as training practical communication skills with the public.

Aija Kaula is a doctor of chemistry who has been working in the banking sector since the 1990s. Aija is particularly fond of contemporary art, which has become a serious hobby for her.
1 / 19

Short portfolios of the art mediators

Education / Evening School

LCCA Evening School is a series of text reading workshops and lectures taking place since 2013. LCCA Evening School is based on the familiarisation with the current contemporary art processes with the aim of fostering the development of critical thinking and discussion in the Latvian art scene. Various issues in contemporary art are discussed through the experience of reading texts of important theoreticians. 

The fourth season of the LCCA Evening School presents series of text reading workshops and lectures by local and international professionals. The cycle is based on exploring the contemporary art processes in order to foster the development of critical thinking and discussion in the Latvian art scene.

Curated by Valts Miķelsons and Inga Lāce.

# Reading workshop 'Nature and naturalness' 

In collaboration wirh artist Linda Vigdorčika 

Texts: 

• Ralph Rugoff, “Signs and Wonders”. 2000.

• Joseph Taylor McRae, “Boy Islands”. 2015.

# Reading workshop ‘Primitivism’ 

Texts: 

• Alain Badiou, “Reflections on the Recent Election”. 2016.

• Carlos Jáuregui, “Anthropophagy”. 2012.

# Reading workshop ‘Choreography in the exhibition halls’ 

Texts: 

• William Forsythe, “Choreographic Objects”.

• Dorothea von Hantelmann, “The Experiential Turn”. 2014.

# Talk by Sezgin Boynik Gregoire Rousseau about Rab-Rab: journal for political and formal inquiries in art  

www.rabrab.fi 

# Reading workshop ‘Art and identity’ 

Texts: 

• Pier Jaarsma and Stellan Welin, “Autism as a Natural Human Variation: Reflections on the Claims of the Neurodiversity Movement”. 2012.

• Nav Haq, “The Invisible and the Visible. Identity Politics and the Economy of Reproduction in Art”. 2015.

# Lecture by Rodolfo Andaur 

Rodolfo Andaur will talk about his curatorial practice and research projects, one of the main focus will be his project in the Tarapacá desert and the following book Tarapacá Landscape. 

Rodolfo Andaur is a Chilean curator, he has been coordinator of various contemporary art projects from northern Chile, promoting local artistic practices, received grants for international curatorial residencies in South Korea, Berlin, Río de Janeiro, Sao Paulo, México City and Poland. He is currently teaching Critical and Curatorial Studies at Adolfo Ibáñez University in Santiago, Chile. He writes for Artishock, ATLAS and Rotunda Magazine. 


Education / Summer School

LCCA Summer School is an international programme of informal education for young and future artists, art and culture critics, curators and culture managers from Latvia and abroad. LCCA Summer School gives its participants the opportunity to exchange ideas with lecturers, guest-curators and workshop supervisors recognised in the art world, developing the skills of critical thinking, argumentation and debate in an interdisciplinary format as well as inviting the participants to collective creative practices.


Britta Marakatt-Labba, Historja, 2003-2007 (fragment), Embrodery, print, appliqué, and wool on linen
1 / 1

Call for Participants !

Summer School Communicating Difficult Pasts in Kuldīga, 2–7 August 2019 


Deadline for applications: 3 June


MA and PhD humanities students, as well as early-career artists, art historians, curators and cultural studies researchers are welcome to apply.

We live in a time of increasing violence, which is gender, community and class based. These aspects need to be considered in order to understand its operation, while finding ways to communicate both past and present violence has become pertinent for understanding contemporary societies. This year’s Summer School programme will explore the complexities of communicating the 20th-century past, and analyse how art and culture can advance debates and thus influence current realities.

For the sixth year the Summer School of the Latvian Centre for Contemporary Art (LCCA) is held in cooperation with Kuldīga Artist Residency, the Art Academy of Latvia and the Estonian Academy of Arts. The Summer School continues to draw on developments in critical thinking, artistic research and creative practices related to actual debates in contemporary culture. This year its central theme will be how violent pasts remain with us and how contemporary artistic research and curatorial projects have found ways to mediate their different dimensions. Our programme will bring together interdisciplinary scholars, artists and curators who have analysed the contemporary legacies of the Second World War and related them to Cold War and postcolonial frameworks .

Difficult knowledge (Roger Simon, Erica Lehrer) and difficult heritage (Sharon MacDonald) offer important perspectives to traumatic and long-silenced histories and modes of their remembering. These discourses bring themes which are often invisible or marginalised in public knowledge. Artists and scholars engaging with these subjects confront the increasingly prevailing representations of selective memory, which by rejecting particular experiences, ignore difficult history. The mediations of difficult pasts we will touch upon concern violent conflicts and traumatic losses, their afterlives in personal experiences, the lives of communities owing to forced migration and deportation, subjugation of indigenous people, practices of exclusion and othering of communities. For instance, how could more complex and layered histories be told that complement disputed pasts with new perspectives, in ways that combine critical consciousness with empathic understanding? How could violent histories be narrated in ethical and audience-conscious ways? The Summer School programme will draw parallels between different histories, which are often confronted with each other in competing terms. Furthermore, we will consider how to apply intersectionality to thinking about the past and present in the Baltic Sea region .

The Summer School Communicating Difficult Pasts will focus on the uneasy relations between pasts and presents, their entangled nature in the 20th century and the impact that these difficult histories have left to contemporary realities in the Baltic Sea region. Topics such as the legacy of right- and left-wing ideologies and their impact on rising populism, intolerance towards cultural difference and marginalisation of ethnic minorities or queer communities are entangled in the region with histories of the Holocaust, Soviet repressions and colonialisms. These experiences are often addressed, researched and discussed locally or nationally; this Summer School aims at understanding the relationships between these difficult and traumatic pasts and articulating their influences and presence today through the perspective of shared histories.

Speakers organising workshops and lectures are distinguished thinkers and experts in the fields of visual art, cultural history and theory, as well as memory, feminist and LGBTQ+ studies. They will introduce research and curatorial projects and discuss intersections between minority studies, postcommunist and postcolonial discourses. The speakers include Violeta Davoliūtė, Professor of Political Science at Vilnius University (tbc), Ilya Lensky, Director of the Museum ‘Jews in Latvia’ (tbc), artist Harri Pälviranta from Finland, Adi Kunstma, Senior Lecturer from the University of Manchester and Norwegian-Sami artist Máret Ánne Sara.

The curators of the Summer School programme are Ieva Astahovska and Margaret Tali.

Participation in the Summer School is free of charge; however, participants must cover partial accommodation and catering costs of 80 EUR.

To apply to participate, please fill out the application form: tiny.cc/lccasummerschool

and submit it by email with a CV and a letter of motivation in English. Additionally, you can add a creative portfolio including projects or one to two publications related to the theme.

The deadline for applications is 3 June 2019. Please email the documents to: lccasummerschool@gmail.com. We will respond to applicants by 14 June.

For any questions regarding application, please contact Ieva Astahovska at ieva.ast@gmail.com